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Home arrow Yoga Lifestyle arrow Theory arrow The channels of Energy in Yoga
The channels of Energy in Yoga PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Massimo   
Wednesday, 14 November 2012

According to the ancient Yoga system in the body exist channels of energy called Nadis. They partially correspond to the Chinese system of the meridians used in acupuncture, and they distribute the Prana (the vital energy) in the body. Here a description.


Sushumna. This is the main nadi that runs up the center of the spine, from the muladhara chakra at the base of the spine to the sahasrara chakra at the crown. A few Upanishads give other locations for its starting point. The normal flow of prana is down this channel. Motoyama associates it with the Governor Vessel meridian [TC]. In some texts it is said to start in the Kanda rather than the Muladhara [SP]. It is described as being made up of the three gunas [SP].
Swami Rama describes it as splitting into two channels above the larynx, one passing through the Ajna chakra, the second along the back of the skull. These are said to terminate in the ventricles, or the Cavity of Brahma. [SB]

It is the proper channel for the kundalini to rise along. [LK]

Ida. This nadi terminates in the left nostril, and is associated with the paravrtti of the ajina chakra. This nadi and those leading off of it are particularly energized when the breath is drawn through the left nostril. Satyananda says this ends at the ajina chakra.[TC]
This nadi is associated with the Moon, with coolness, and a decreased metabolism (physcial calming). [LK]

Pingala. This nadi terminates in the right nostal, and is associated with the aparavrtti of the ajina chackra. This nadi and those leading off of it are particularly energized when the breath is drawn through the right nostril. Satyananda says this ends at the ajina chakra.[TC]
Although many contemporary sources describe the ida and pingala as spiraling about the sushumna, intersecting in the chakras, none of the old sources referred to by Motoyama describes any intersections. Most of these sources have them terminating in the ajina chakra. They have been compared to the sympathetic nerve trunks that wrap around the spine. Motoyama associates these with the inside (secondary) lines of the Urinary Bladder meridian. [TC]

Swami Rama describes the Ida and Pingala as criss-crossing up the spine. He says that ordinarily there is prana flowing in these two channels, but not in the Sushumna. [SB]

This nadi is associated with the Sun, with heat, and an increased metabolism. It is particularly unpleasant when the kundalini rises up the pingala rather than the Sushumna. [LK]

Gandhari. This nadi flows beside and behind the ida and terminates in the left eye. Motoyama associates this nadi with the outside (tertiary) line of the Urinary Bladder meridian. [TC]
Hastijihva. This nadi is describe in various locations in the texts, which associate it with the ida, the left big toe, and either the right eye or the ears. Motoyama associates this nadi with the first line of the Urinary Bladder meridian, just left of the posterior median line along the spine. [TC]
Motoyama discounts the one reference to the big toe for the hastijihva and yashasvini nadis, as this would imply association with the Spleen or Liver meridians, which run up the front side of the body. [TC]

Pusha. This nadi runs behind the pingala up to the right eye. It appears to be paired with the gandhari and is also associated with the outside (tertiary) line of the Urinary Bladder meridian.[TC]
Yashasvini. Motoyama concludes that this nadi runs just to the right and behind the sushumna. It is paired with the hastijihva and is also associated with the first line of the Urinary Bladder meridian.[TC]
Alambusa. This nadi appears to run from the anus to Kandasthana and upwards to the mouth (tonsils). Motoyama associates this nadi with the Conception Vessel meridian.[TC]
Kuhu. This nadi said to start in a region which is probably near the pharynx, from which it runs downward and then upward to the tip of the nose. This suggests that it lies in front of the sushumna. Other texts say it ends in the genitals. Motoyama associates this nadi with the Liver meridian.[TC]
Shankhini. This nadi is said to have its pivotal point at the throat, with connections to the anus, penis, and the muladhara chakra, and the ears. Motoyama associates this nadi with the Kidney meridian. Some texts describe it as being between the gandhari and sarasvati nadis, which would place it on the back and prevent this association (see note on viewing the nadis, above). [TC]
Sarasvati. This nadi is said to rise to one side of the sushumna, possibly the left. Only one text describes is as behind the sushumna. Motoyama prefers to consider it in front and thus to correspond to the Spleen meridian. [TC]
Varuni. The descriptions are varied and vague, but seem to associate this nadi with the lower abdomen. In some texts this nadi is said to be the the large intestine etc. The term nadi is also used for the urethra, the fallopian tubes etc. In this case this nadi would have no correlation to any meridian. [TC]
Payasvini. This nadi is said to run between the Pusha and Saraavati nadis and ends at the ear. Motoyama associates this nadi with the Gall Bladder meridian. [TC]
Shura. This nadi runs from the navel area to the point between the eyebrows. It is difficult to pair this with any of the meridians. [TC]
Visvodari. This nadi runs between the Kuhu and Hastijihva nadis. It is also said to lie beside the Kandasthana and to receive four kinds of nourishment. Motoyama suggest that it corresponds to the Stomach meridian. [TC]
Vajra. This nadi is said to run through the middle of the Sushumna, from the genitals to the head. [SP].
Chitrini. This nadi is described as the center-most part of the Sushumna, shining with the luster of OM. She is said to embody all bliss, and to be the awakener of pure knowledge. It is very subtle, and beautiful, and contains the Brahma-nadi. [SP]
In the Yoga Upanishads the number is given as anywhere from 1,000 to 350,000, with 72,000 being most common. Of these ten, fourteen, or fifteen are deemed of particular significance. Combined these yield about 20 nadis listed in Motoyama's chart. [TC]

 

Nadis, channels of energy in Yoga

 

Last Updated ( Sunday, 26 February 2017 )
 
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